2014-15 Season Auditions!

Children singing with twilight visible through the windows behind them.

Salt Lake Children’s Choir performing in the Excellence in the Community Concert Series, Spring 2014. Photo by Lex Anderson

Participating in the Salt Lake Children’s Choir is a great way to expose your child to the wonderful world of classical music.  The Choir is now scheduling auditions for children between ages 8-15.  No previous musical experience is required.  Please call 801-537-1412 to set up an audition or to find out more.   Please share this announcement with friends, family and neighbors who might be interested!

Presenting the Phoenix Boys Choir

Phoenix Boys Choir_Federal Heights_WebThe Salt Lake Children’s Choir is excited to be hosting the Phoenix Boys Choir for a few days this June.  They are visiting Salt Lake City as part of their 2014 tour of the Western States.  On Saturday, June 14th at 7:30 p.m., they will present a free concert at the Federal Heights LDS Chapel, Virginia Street (1340 E.) and Fairfax Road (335 North).  Our choir will also participate in this concert.   Please help us get the word out and fill the chapel for these visitors! It will be a beautiful evening and an exciting opportunity to hear a world-renowned boys choir. Founded in 1947, the Phoenix Boys Choir has programs featuring training in voice, music theory, and performance for boys age 7 to 14.

While in Salt Lake, the boys choir will also sing an extended postlude for Mass at the Cathedral of the Madeleine on Sunday, June 15th before continuing on to Park City.  To view the rest of their tour schedule or learn more about them, please visit: http://www.boyschoir.org/ 

 

Spring Concert Program Notes, 2014

As our concert approaches this weekend, we wanted to share some program notes on some of the pieces to be performed written by our artistic director, and founder, of the choir – Ralph B. Woodward.  The concerts will truly be a journey across the history of music in both time and geography.  We hope that you enjoy learning more about the music, its place in the world and the relationship our choir has with some of these pieces.  Of course, no reading takes the place of hearing the real thing!  Please join us on May 2 & 3.  (Additional concert details available in the previous post – Tickets available from our website or at the door).

Hodie Apparuit:  This is a short motet by the great Franco-Flemish master Orlando di Lasso and is a prime example of 16th Century polyphony.  Its wonderful interweaving of parts makes it an extremely gratifying work to sing and to hear (the kids love it).

Bonne Nuit:  One of the great joys of working with these young people is to see what they can do with the Art Song.   We sing many of this genre–usually those by German masters.  However, in the beginning years of our choir, the very early ’80′s, one member’s mother (who also belonged to our first choir board) loaned me a book of songs which happened to contain the charming “Bonne Nuit  by the French composer, Jules Massenet (probably best known to most for his violin solo, “Meditation”–from the opera, Thais).  I then made an adaptation for the choir and we have done it periodically over the years.  I had never heard this charming song  before, and I have never heard it since — other than being sung by our choir.

Techot Volga ( by M. Fradkin):  This is a much loved by older Russians, and  was first sung by our choir in 1987.  It speaks of the permanence of the ever-flowing Volga and the stages and changes in our lives.  It is wistful, expressive and very beautiful. .

Caliche (by R. Alarcon):  This popular Chilean song, in the “cueca” dance rhythm, is a real favorite.  It refers, in endearing terms,  to  dark-complected “Caliche, ” which I originally thought meant a pretty girl.  In fact, this is a symbolic reference to a black ore that is mined in Northern Chile and which sustains  many miners of that area and their families.

Turn Ye to Me: from Scotland, is a bitter-sweet song of parting of someone who is leaving a loved one to go to sea.

Follow Me Down to Carlow: a rousing Irish dance tune, is one of the Choir’s all-time favorites.

Makedonska Devoice:  from the Republic of Macedonia (formerly part of Yugoslavia and not to be confused with Greek Macedonia) was introduced to me by a friend from Bosnia.  It is very tuneful, rhythmic (in 7/8) and very popular all over the Balkans.

Vienna, City of My Dreams:  This captivating waltz by Rudolf Sieczynski is much loved the world over (and especially by German-speaking people). It is full of irresistible Viennese charm and one of our favorites,

Kaya Kaymanta Ripusaj:  An Andean song of farewell from Bolivia in the ‘quechua’ language (language of the Incas)–with a couple of Spanish words. The melody and complimentary harmonies (which we have added) have a unique, mystical quality.

Palomita del arrozal:  This song is also from Bolivia, but from the Santa Cruz region–which is lower and more tropical.  It’s lyrics are mostly Spanish–but also include words of the native Guarani people of that area.

Kapusi Kali Kongo: is a novelty song from Zambia with fascinating poly-rhythmic percussion.

On the Sunny Side of the Street by Jimmy McHugh:  This popular American standard will be a lively, refreshing return to our own shores.  The perrformance will be complete with skat singing by the choir and the artistry of jazz pianist extraordinaire, Steve Keen.

Spring Concerts! May 2 & 3, 2014

Children singing with twilight visible through the windows behind them.

Salt Lake Children’s Choir performing in the Excellence in the Community Concert Series, Spring 2014. Photo by Lex Anderson

From Vienna —  to the Andes —  to “The Sunny Side of the Street”, a concert by the award winning Salt Lake Children’s Choir, will be presented  Friday and Saturday, May 2 and 3, at 7:30 PM in Salt  Lake City’s beautiful St. Ambrose Church (1975 South 2300 East). Spanning four centuries and four continents, the program will include musical treasures, both familiar and little known, from the British Isles, Eastern and Western Europe, Africa, South America and the USA — including the much-loved “On Wings of Song” and “Vienna, My City of Dreams” — as well as the lively “Follow Me Down to Carlow” from Ireland and the wistful Bolivian “Kaya Kaymanta Ripusaj”–sung in native Quechua, the language of the Incas.  Jazz pianist extraordinaire Steve Keen will join the choir on Woodward’s rhythmic “Canto” and the American favorite, “On the Sunny Side of the Street.  The evening will conclude with the choir’s own “Evening Prayer” and. “A Day in Spring.”

All seats are $9:00 ($6.00 students) and tickets are available at Day Murray Music or at the door.   Online tickets can be purchased here and will be held at will call on the nights of the concerts.   Admission is open to those ages 6 and older.

Please note:  The choir is now scheduling auditions for new members, and there will be a sign-up sheet for an audition time at the concert for those who attend.

 

Choral music enriches a child’s life

Feeling strongly that the study of choral music was beneficial for my children, I wanted to see what supportive evidence was out there. So I Googled, “Why should children study choral music?” These were a few sites that caught my eye:

The Central Coast Children’s Choir web page listed a good number of benefits. I liked what I saw, but I wanted more . . . so I ventured to the Chorister’s Guild, which not only had some information to answer my question, but some helpful suggestions. Still not satisfied I had learned enough, I gathered some interesting insights on the Classics for Kids website. I’m sure there is more out there, but here’s what I learned:

First some benefits:

  • Music is Science, and is exact and specific. This is comforting to my children because it helps them to make sense of the chaotic, ever changing world around them. I think it is safe to say the music brings them peace.
  • Music is Mathematical with its divisions of time into fractions. Who couldn’t use more math practice? Learning a piece of music with its various dynamics is like deciphering a puzzle. It’s great brain exercise, as the mind figures out how all the parts work together to create the final piece.
  • Music is History; it reflects the environments and cultures from the time and place it was created. Any time we study the arts of a particular time period, we gain understanding and empathy for others.
  • Music is a Foreign Language, using symbols to represent ideas. And lyrics are often sung in foreign languages. My children have sung songs in Japanese, German, Russian, Spanish, Navajo and French, to name a few.
  • Music is Physical: it requires good posture, proper breathing, coordination, and muscle control. The body and mind, then, work together, responding to sound as it enters through the ears, interpreting that sound with the mind, and producing the notes their eyes see.
  • Music is Critical Thinking. It provides the opportunity to develop insight and requires thought to understand the lyrics and create the music’s dynamics.
  • Music is Emotional and it is Art: It involves all of our being. The child enters a creative zone as he focuses intently and puts forth concentrated effort, making it a good stress release. The musician has a passionate, whole body experience. And she gives a performance that serves self and the community as it heightens the life experience for both. Let’s just say, music is joy.

 The benefits go deeper

As you can see, the benefits go far beyond musical skill. The experience enriches many facets of a child’s life and opens doors to many other skills.

  • Studies prove that participation in choir, band, and orchestra raises student IQ and improves the ability to think and reason. The students also have higher SAT scores. And the longer students participate in musical programs, the greater the impact on their learning.
  • Music performance uses almost every part of the brain because a person must synthesize an array of skills and concepts.
  • The choral setting provides emotional and social growth. The individual and team work required provide members an understanding of self and others. This also translates to success in the child’s future workplace.
  • Students learn to make good judgments.
  • They learn that problems have multiple solutions; they do the problem solving and they realize there are unanticipated solutions to be discovered.
  • They learn to say poetically what cannot be communicated with standard methods.
  • Children learn what’s important. They learn to dig into the details, and then step back and get the big picture as well.

Choir on KBYU: Dec 9 – 13

Don’t miss the chance to hear the Choir from the comfort of your own home.  Tune in to 89.1 FM

SALT LAKE CHILDREN’S CHOIR AT CHRISTMAS
Dec 9-13 at 11am and 4:06
children in cathedral

Wednesday Choir’s Dress Rehearsal at the Cathedral of the Madeleine 2013

Join Classical 89 for selections from the choir’s 2012 Christmas concert in the Cathedral of the Madeleine. Favorite carols, music from many lands, newer compositions, and lesser-known gems.

Salt Lake Children’s Choir at the Cathedral – Christmas 2013

children in cathedral

Wednesday Choir’s Dress Rehearsal at the Cathedral of the Madeleine 2013

The Salt Lake Children’s Choir, Ralph B. Woodward, Artistic Director, will present its traditional Christmas Concerts Friday, Dec. 6 and Sunday, Dec. 8 at 8:00 PM in the Cathedral of the Madeleine (331 E South Temple). Featured will be works by di Lasso, Handel, and other early masters, as well as familiar and lesser-known carols from many lands–including “Lo, How a Rose E’er Blooming,” “Infant Holy, Infant Lowly,” Ill est ne, le divin Enfant, and the Peruvian villancico, “Venir, pastorcitos.” Also heard will be the title theme from the motion picture, “King of Kings” by Miklos Rozsa. The evening will conclude with audience and choir joining in several carol favorites. Accompaniment will be by harpist Lisa Rytting and organist Ken Udy. There is no charge, but admission is limited to those over 6 years of age.

Just in time for Christmas…

DVD bannerLast spring’s concert  has been produced into a beautiful DVD now available for purchase. We are also releasing a CD with 18 selections from the 2012 Christmas Concert.   They will make excellent keepsakes of your child’s participation in the choir or as gifts to family and friends not near enough to attend the concerts. Below is a clip taken from the DVD as a preview.

Pricing is as follows:

  • 2013 Spring Concert DVD:  $20 (first copy),  $10 (additional copies)
  • 2012 Christmas audio CD:  $15 (first copy),   $10 (additional copies)
  • DVD/CD Combo:  $30
  • Shipping:  $4 per address, domestic only. Free pick up option available at the Community Christmas Concert on December 22nd.

To place an order, please click here to send an email to the choir listing the items you would like to order, shipping addresses (if applicable), and a phone number in case we need to clarify anything. You will receive a PayPal Invoice from the choir for these items which you can then pay by PayPal, credit card, or mailed check. The order is not final until the payment is received. Be sure to include your preferences for shipping or pick-up at our upcoming holiday concerts.

If you would prefer to place an order over the phone or have any questions, please call/text Ali at 801-792-9641 or email slcc@q.com

Contact us for information on Blu-ray discs if interested.

Celebration of Christ tickets now available!

poster for Celebration of Christ Concert, November 30th, 2013 in the Salt Lake Tabernacle on Temple Square.

The Salt Lake Children’s Choir will be appearing as part of a large cast in the “Celebration of Christ” Concert on November 30th, 2013.

The choir’s first public Christmas appearance will be at the Tabernacle on Temple Square on November 30th.  The concert is titled “A Celebration of Christ” and features the choir, Vocal Point (from BYU) and Jenny Oaks Baker as well as performers from many Christian denominations in the Salt Lake Valley.  Tickets can be purchased from LDS events for $10 general admission.  There are two shows that day:  a matinee at 4:30 p.m. and an evening performance at 8:00 p.m.